Monday, October 23, 2017

Vietnam, Part 5


This is the fourth person I spoke with.  All of these stories are so different, it's almost as if they might have been fighting the same war, but in very different ways.   If you haven't seen the others in this series, you can read "Barry's" story here, "Jesse's" story here, and "Ted's" story here.

If you recall, I asked each vet for his year of birth, what year he went to Vietnam, and where he was stationed.  I also asked if he enlisted or was drafted.  Then I asked for some personal feelings about things he remembered from the war.

Please be aware these stories were told in my own words, based on the information and facts each serviceman provided me.

Because this affects how I feel about Vietnam and how these veterans bared their souls, I'm adding it to Elke's theme, Landscapes of the Soul at Art Journal Journey. 

This is "Jim's" story.  He was very vocal.  He would talk calmly for awhile, then go off on a tirade over something I said or asked.

I searched the internet for a crop duster, but all I could find was this antique plane, I hoped might look like one.  Suddenly, I found all these old airplane buttons in my stash and decided to use them, too.  At first I didn't want to cut the loops off the buttons for fear they would fall apart (they are in two parts), but once I added the E6000 glue, they stayed intact quite well.

I asked Jim to explain the word "grunt."  He first told me it probably meant "boots on the ground."  Then he gave me these better explanations.

Now you understand the significance of the planes.  They dropped tons and tons of Agent Orange over a good part of the countryside in Vietnam, as well as eastern Laos and Cambodia, where the Ho Chi Minh Trail was located.

Jim also told me he and his fellow American veterans were not the only ones looking for aid from Agent Orange.  The Vietnamese were also affected and wanted reparations for the lives that were destroyed or the children who were born deformed in some way.   

Jim was just another divorce statistic that was often the case with returning vets.  From what I've read and been told, divorce was often synonymous with Vietnam vets, whether they were married before they went to Vietnam, or after they returned home from their tour of duty.

Although I forgot to add something Jim told me, he said one thing that kept him sane was his love of photography.  He kept a camera with him at all times and took photos of both happy and sad times.  He told me he sent all the film home and never saw any of the photos until he returned stateside. 

I used this picture to show a photo he might have taken when he was on leave.

I used the back of the previous page (three pages sewn together) as my substrate.   You can see the heavier bobbin thread didn't correct my tension problem.  I added computer generated text, an image from the internet, four airplane buttons, and one colored image from a travel magazine.

I have one more person whose story I have received, then I will create another page from my point of view.  Thanks for visiting with me today.  I hope you are enjoying this series, and how very different each person's view of the war was.  Thanks also for joining me at Art Journal Journey.  I hope to see you there, too.

 

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Vietnam, Part 4


The third person I spoke with had a completely different experience in the Vietnam war.  If you haven't seen the others in this series, you can read "Barry's" story here and "Jesse's" story here.

If you recall, I asked for each vet's year of birth, what year they went to Vietnam, and where they were stationed.  I also asked if they enlisted or were drafted.  Then I asked for some personal feelings about things they remember from the war.

Please be aware these stories were told in my own words, based on the information and facts each serviceman provided me. The names are fictitious, their stories are not.

Because this affects how I feel about Vietnam and how these veterans bared their souls, I'm adding it to Elke's theme, Landscapes of the Soul at Art Journal Journey. 

"Ted" may have been the most articulate of all the veterans I interviewed, even though he was unable to provide me with a lot of details of his time in Vietnam.


He did admit he spent time on a Naval base and visited Saigon.  He and his wife are vegetarians, so I suspect this is a photo he would enjoy from the market in Sa Dec, a town near the Mekong River.


I was quite surprised when he told me how little he was aware of what was going on in the states during this time.  It was almost as if he was disconnected with the outside world.



I began by sewing three pieces of heavy card stock together for my background.  This is the bobbin side and I used heavy black thread in hopes of helping the tension problems I seem to be experiencing.  Since "Ted" was in the Navy, I used my handmade chevron stamp on the blue portion of the paper.  I used white acrylic paint instead of ink.  I looked high and low for an anchor charm I bought a couple years ago, but gave up after I couldn't find it in a day's time.  The story was computer generated, and the black and white image was one I printed from my stash.  The colored image was from a travel magazine.

Thanks for joining me today at Art Journal Journey.   And thanks for your visit here, too.

Saturday, October 21, 2017

It's Halloween time


Today, before it's too late, I am joining Moo-Mania & More and Try it on Tuesday.  They both are featuring Halloween as their theme this fortnight.

I finished this about 11:30 p.m. my time, so the lighting is absolutely atrocious.  I'm hoping a few step out photos will help.

I thought this might add a bit of humor

when I added the message to the beak of the bird.




I wish I hadn't outlined the pumpkins, even though they didn't stand out well before I did.

I thought they looked garish after the outlines were in place.

I'm working in my new Challenges altered book (AB), but wish I'd added it to my Halloween AB instead.  For the background, I used the very last of my orange acrylic paint, images I found in my stash, and a message found on the back of my new candle lighter package.

Thanks for visiting today.  I always appreciate your visit, especially when it's on the weekend.  And don't forget to visit Moo-Mania & More and Try it on Tuesday where their theme is Halloween.  Maybe you can join in, too!

Friday, October 20, 2017

Friday Smiles # 243???


Some of my regular readers saw a sneak peek at the History Museum I visited at the end of September.  I have SO many photos, I thought I would share a few of them each Friday for awhile, along with some funny stories, quotes, verse, or jokes I found when I was cleaning my office.

I'll share the funny stuff first, so you don't have to see the photos of the museum if you are just here for Annie's Friday Smiles.

To keep a marriage brimming
With love in the loving cup,
Whenever you're wrong admit it;
Whenever you're right, shut up.
~ Ogden Nash

Q. What do you call a boomerang that doesn't come back"
A. A stick.

He thought he was a wit and he was half right.

A successful marriage requires falling in love many times, always with the same person.

An old man sees a friend sitting on a park bench weeping.  "How have things been with you, Bob," he asks his older friend.
"Great.  I just married a beautiful young woman."
"Wonderful! But then why are you crying?"
"I can't remember where I live."

I hope at least one or two of those made you smile.  Now for some photos of the History Museum.

This is the first room you enter after you pay.  Of course, all I needed was a ticket provided by the Smithsonian Museum Day event.

I loved the sign and the examples of texting a century ago.




Postcards from some of the buildings from 100 years or so ago.



I realize this may not be something you want to learn about, because most of the items here deal with either our state's sesquicentennial or interesting facts about my city.

Part of the problem is, lots of displays are behind glass and difficult to photograph.

From the time when native Americans ruled the plains.

What I loved about this museum was there were lots of hands ON things you could do,

like call a local phone number for $0.10 (1/10th of a dollar).


Of course, I had to sit in the phone booth, but could only get adequate photos from outside the booth.

You should also be able to type something on this typewriter,

but when I tried, I saw the ribbon was at the end of the spool.

I walked out of the first room and saw this picture of the History Museum in the alcove as I climbed the stairs to the second floor.  I'll share more photos from this museum next Friday.

Thanks for visiting today and now let's head to A Stitch in Time for a Friday Smile.   It's always great to start the weekend with a smile.